LOWER SOMATIC CELL COUNT

A trial to see whether Cow and Calf Formula could assist in reducing high cell counts was done on Bruce Tiddy’s Farm near Matamata in late February/early March 2008.

Twenty cows with counts above 500,000 were drenched with 100ml of dilute Formula each day for ten days.

Fifteen cows, or 75% had markedly lower cell counts at the end of the trial, with most of these having reduced by around 75% from their starting levels.

INCREASE IN MILK PRODUCTION

A science based trial, conducted over a whole milking season during 2013/14 was held at Kahikatea Dairy Farm near Paeroa.

This involved daily feeding of 5ml of Cow and Calf Formula concentrate (diluted to 50ml) to 400 cows in a randomly selected test herd, with the remaining 600 cows of the overall herd as a control.

All cows were mainly pasture fed, with individual helpings of PKE delivered in-shed at one milking, with the diluted Formula injected onto each helping of the test cows.

Equipment installed in-shed monitored both individual cow milk production, and milk quality.

Considerable attention was paid to ensure that the test herd did not reflect any particular bias in relation to breed, genomic makeup, calving date, or breeding worth (as measured against the LIC national database), or bias in treatment.

Over the whole season the test herd produced an average of 4.7% more milk than the control, although rates of increase varied from month to month (measured from August to April), and were less during a drought of December/January, when pasture feed levels dropped. With individual doses costing around 0.88c/cow, overall investment in treatment per cow was calculated to be around $32.12 for the season.

FARMING SHOW TRIAL UNDERWAY

A season-long trial being conducted on the Southland farm of Jamie Mackay, host of the Farming Show, will attempt to measure three attributes claimed by the makers of Cow and Calf Formula.

These relate to an overall increase in milk production in healthy cows, a reduction in ill health or somatic cell count in ailing cows, and turning out a bunch of healthy calves fed Formula in their milk feeds, to see whether they have less ill health and reach good weight gains faster than in previous seasons.

Equipment installed in-shed monitored both individual cow milk production, and milk quality.

Considerable attention was paid to ensure that the test herd did not reflect any particular bias in relation to breed, genomic makeup, calving date, or breeding worth (as measured against the LIC national database), or bias in treatment.

Over the whole season the test herd produced an average of 4.7% more milk than the control, although rates of increase varied from month to month (measured from August to April), and were less during a drought of December/January, when pasture feed levels dropped. With individual doses costing around 0.88c/cow, overall investment in treatment per cow was calculated to be around $32.12 for the season.